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On July 23, 1599, Caravaggio received his first public commission for painting. The end results were the Martyrdom of Saint Matthew and Calling of Saint Matthew, pictured above. 

Tags: art history
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georgetakei:

Oh Myy

georgetakei:

Oh Myy

(Source: kad-cafe, via backshootingford)

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"In Martinique, I had visited rustic and neglected rum-distilleries where the equipment and the methods used had not changed since the eighteenth century. In Puerto Rico, on the other hand, in the factories of the company which enjoys a virtual monopoly over the whole of the sugar production, I was faced by a display of white enamel tanks and chromium piping. Yet the various kinds of Martinique rum, as I tasted them in front of ancient wooden vats thickly encrusted with waste matter, were mellow and scented, whereas those of Puerto Rico are coarse and harsh. We may suppose, then, that the subtlety of the Martinique rums is dependent on impurities the continuance of which is encouraged by the archaic method of production. To me, this contrast illustrates the paradox of civilization: its charms are due essentially to the various residues it carries along with it, although this does not absolve us of the obligation to purify the stream. By being doubly in the right, we are admitting our mistake. We are right to be rational and to try to increase our production and so keep manufacturing costs down. But we are also right to cherish those very imperfections we are endeavouring to eliminate. Social life consists in destroying that which gives it its savour."

— Claude Lev-Strauss, Tristes Tropiques. The underlying philosophy of liberalism, and the consumer culture it generates, condensed into nine sentences. (via ayjay)

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On Earth Day this year, NASA asked people all around the world a simple question – “Where are you on Earth Right Now?”

We asked people to answer the question on social media, with a selfie. The goal was to use each picture as a pixel in the creation of a “Global Selfie” – a mosaic image that would look like Earth appeared from space on Earth Day.

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The Making of NASA’s Global Selfie: 100 Countries, Thousands of Photos | NASA
Super cool.

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Life Itself - Official Trailer

Sign me up, this looks good.

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"The audience actually wants to work for their meal. They just don’t want to know that they’re doing that. That’s your job as a storyteller is to hide the fact that you’re making them work for their meal. We’re born problem solvers. We’re compelled to deduce and to deduct because that’s what we do in real life. It’s this well-organized absence of information that draws us in."

Pixar filmmaker Andrew Stanton in an altogether fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour exploring what makes a great story

Complement with more secrets of storytelling from Vladimir Nabokov, Kurt Vonnegut and Neil Gaiman, then see the neurochemistry of storytelling and the dramatic art.

(via explore-blog)

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"My films are not a personal expression but a prayer. When I make a film, it’s like a holy day. As if I were lighting a candle in front of an icon, or placing a bouquet of flowers before it. The spectator always ends up by understanding when you are sincere in what you are telling him. I don’t invent any language to appear simpler, stupider, or smarter. A lack of honesty would destroy the dialogue. Time has worked for me. When people understood that I was speaking a natural language, that I wasn’t pretending, that I didn’t take them for imbeciles, that I only say what I think, then they became interested in what I was doing."
"Given the competition with commercial cinema, a director has a particular responsibility towards his audiences. I mean by this that because of cinema’s unique power to affect an auditorium—in the identification of the screen with life—the most meaningless, unreal commercial film can have just the same kind of magical effect on the uncritical and uneducated cinema-goer as that derived by his discerning counterpart from a real film. The tragic and crucial difference is that if art can stimulate emotions and ideas, mass-appeal cinema, because of its easy, irresistible effect, extinguishes all traces of thought and feeling irrevocably. People cease to feel any need for the beautiful or the spiritual, and consume films like bottles of Coca-Cola.”
Andrei TarkovskyApril 4, 1932 — December 29, 1986

"My films are not a personal expression but a prayer. When I make a film, it’s like a holy day. As if I were lighting a candle in front of an icon, or placing a bouquet of flowers before it. The spectator always ends up by understanding when you are sincere in what you are telling him. I don’t invent any language to appear simpler, stupider, or smarter. A lack of honesty would destroy the dialogue. Time has worked for me. When people understood that I was speaking a natural language, that I wasn’t pretending, that I didn’t take them for imbeciles, that I only say what I think, then they became interested in what I was doing."

"Given the competition with commercial cinema, a director has a particular responsibility towards his audiences. I mean by this that because of cinema’s unique power to affect an auditorium—in the identification of the screen with life—the most meaningless, unreal commercial film can have just the same kind of magical effect on the uncritical and uneducated cinema-goer as that derived by his discerning counterpart from a real film. The tragic and crucial difference is that if art can stimulate emotions and ideas, mass-appeal cinema, because of its easy, irresistible effect, extinguishes all traces of thought and feeling irrevocably. People cease to feel any need for the beautiful or the spiritual, and consume films like bottles of Coca-Cola.”

Andrei Tarkovsky
April 4, 1932 — December 29, 1986

(Source: strangewood)

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I’m speechless.

Jelani Eddington at the Sanfilippo Wurlitzer playing the Star Wars Symphonic Suite.

(Source: youtube.com)

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Tim Cook has openly stated that Apple is working on “new product” categories. Many people, customers and competitors alike, assume that means some kind of wearable computing device. And of course that means it has to be some kind of “smartwatch”, right?

I don’t think so.

"

— If you’re interested in the whole wearable tech idea, you need to read this post by Craig Hockenberry (he wrote Twitterrific, one of the very first apps ever on the App Store and still a popular Twitter client).

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samsmyth:

Annie Atkins: Designing for The Grand Budapest Hotel
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"I think that in order to find reality, each must search for his own universe, look for the details that contribute to this reality that one feels under the surface of things. To be an artist means to search, to find and look at these realities. To be an artist means never to look away."

Akira Kurosawa
March 23, 1910 — September 6, 1998

Happy Birthday, Kurosawa-san.

(Source: kurosawa-akira, via strangewood)

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Mike Fahey at Kotaku celebrates the original release of Katamari Damacy:Released by Namco in Japan on March 18, 2004, Katamari Damacy was the sort of strange, Japanese-flavored game that normally wouldn’t make its was to the West. With its brilliantly simple design, bizarre humor, eccentric art style and the most wonderfully quirky soundtrack in the history of music being made for things, this odd little game about rolling everything (everything) into a massive sticky ball Would never had made it to the states a few years prior.
It was so weird and oh so much fun.

Mike Fahey at Kotaku celebrates the original release of Katamari Damacy:

Released by Namco in Japan on March 18, 2004, Katamari Damacy was the sort of strange, Japanese-flavored game that normally wouldn’t make its was to the West. With its brilliantly simple design, bizarre humor, eccentric art style and the most wonderfully quirky soundtrack in the history of music being made for things, this odd little game about rolling everything (everything) into a massive sticky ball Would never had made it to the states a few years prior.

It was so weird and oh so much fun.

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Saw this tonight at the Tara. Packed house. So so good. Storybookish and neat visually, with all the characteristic Wes Anderson touches like predominantly symmetrical compositions, lush color palettes, and stage-like lighting. It’s remarkable how identifiable Anderson’s films are, as much for their cohesive charm as their disparate looks and sounds. There’s a scene on a cable car where the car stops abruptly halfway up (in the middle of the screen, naturally) and rocks squeakily. The squeaks stay in time with the music! I felt like I was being hypnotized into just loving the movie.

Little touches like that fill Anderson’s films, and they’re delightful for it. The Grand Budapest Hotel was no exception. Also, Ralph Fiennes is just amazing.